Hamed Kabine Toure, a refugee from Côte d'Ivoire, poses for a portrait in his tailor shop in Elegushi market, Lagos State. Now a successful entrepreneur, he has spent 10 years in Nigeria before opening his womens' clothes boutique in the arts&crafts market. With a grant from UNHCR, he could pay for sewing machines, a generator and the salaries of two Nigerian apprentices. "My community is now the market", he rejoices. Hamed is expecting a microcredit loan to buy more specialised tools and thus develop his business.
Hamed Kabine Toure, a refugee from Côte d'Ivoire, poses for a portrait in his tailor shop in Elegushi market, Lagos State. Now a successful entrepreneur, he has spent 10 years in Nigeria before opening his womens' clothes boutique in the arts&crafts market. With a grant from UNHCR, he could pay for sewing machines, a generator and the salaries of two Nigerian apprentices. "My community is now the market", he rejoices. Hamed is expecting a microcredit loan to buy more specialised tools and thus develop his business.
Hamed Kabine Toure, a refugee from Côte d'Ivoire, shows his tailor shop to UNHCR staff during a monitoring visit in Elegushi market, Lagos State. Now a successful entrepreneur, he has spent 10 years in Nigeria before opening his womens' clothes boutique in the arts&crafts market. With a grant from UNHCR, he could pay for sewing machines, a generator and the salaries of two Nigerian apprentices. "My community is now the market", he rejoices. Hamed is expecting a microcredit loan to buy more specialised tools and thus develop his business.
Hamed Kabine Toure, a refugee from Côte d'Ivoire, shows his tailor shop to UNHCR staff during a monitoring visit in Elegushi market, Lagos State. Now a successful entrepreneur, he has spent 10 years in Nigeria before opening his womens' clothes boutique in the arts&crafts market. With a grant from UNHCR, he could pay for sewing machines, a generator and the salaries of two Nigerian apprentices. "My community is now the market", he rejoices. Hamed is expecting a microcredit loan to buy more specialised tools and thus develop his business.
Hamed Kabine Toure, a refugee from Côte d'Ivoire, shows his tailor shop to UNHCR staff during a monitoring visit in Elegushi market, Lagos State. Now a successful entrepreneur, he has spent 10 years in Nigeria before opening his womens' clothes boutique in the arts&crafts market. With a grant from UNHCR, he could pay for sewing machines, a generator and the salaries of two Nigerian apprentices. "My community is now the market", he rejoices. Hamed is expecting a microcredit loan to buy more specialised tools and thus develop his business.
Hamed Kabine Toure, a refugee from Côte d'Ivoire, shows his tailor shop to UNHCR staff during a monitoring visit in Elegushi market, Lagos State. Now a successful entrepreneur, he has spent 10 years in Nigeria before opening his womens' clothes boutique in the arts&crafts market. With a grant from UNHCR, he could pay for sewing machines, a generator and the salaries of two Nigerian apprentices. "My community is now the market", he rejoices. Hamed is expecting a microcredit loan to buy more specialised tools and thus develop his business.
Hamed Kabine Toure, a refugee from Côte d'Ivoire, works inside in tailor shop in Elegushi market, Lagos State. Now a successful entrepreneur, he has spent 10 years in Nigeria before opening his womens' clothes boutique in the arts&crafts market. With a grant from UNHCR, he could pay for sewing machines, a generator and the salaries of two Nigerian apprentices. "My community is now the market", he rejoices. Hamed is expecting a microcredit loan to buy more specialised tools and thus develop his business.
Hamed Kabine Toure, a refugee from Côte d'Ivoire, works inside in tailor shop in Elegushi market, Lagos State. Now a successful entrepreneur, he has spent 10 years in Nigeria before opening his womens' clothes boutique in the arts&crafts market. With a grant from UNHCR, he could pay for sewing machines, a generator and the salaries of two Nigerian apprentices. "My community is now the market", he rejoices. Hamed is expecting a microcredit loan to buy more specialised tools and thus develop his business.
Hamed Kabine Toure, a refugee from Côte d'Ivoire, works inside in tailor shop in Elegushi market, Lagos State. Now a successful entrepreneur, he has spent 10 years in Nigeria before opening his womens' clothes boutique in the arts&crafts market. With a grant from UNHCR, he could pay for sewing machines, a generator and the salaries of two Nigerian apprentices. "My community is now the market", he rejoices. Hamed is expecting a microcredit loan to buy more specialised tools and thus develop his business.
Hamed Kabine Toure, a refugee from Côte d'Ivoire, works inside in tailor shop in Elegushi market, Lagos State. Now a successful entrepreneur, he has spent 10 years in Nigeria before opening his womens' clothes boutique in the arts&crafts market. With a grant from UNHCR, he could pay for sewing machines, a generator and the salaries of two Nigerian apprentices. "My community is now the market", he rejoices. Hamed is expecting a microcredit loan to buy more specialised tools and thus develop his business.
Laso poses for a portrait inside his tailor shop in high-end Ajah market, Lagos State.Living in Nigeria after he fled from Côte d’Ivoire in 2010, he now owns a successful men’s clothes shop and employs two Nigerian apprentices, thanks to an entrepreneurship training provided by UNHCR’s partner Justice, Development & Peace Commission.“It’s not because I’m a refugee that I cannot achieve what I want”, he asserts, while recognising his daily struggles with security, the Covid-19 pandemic and his foreigner status. He applied for a microcredit loan to develop his business.
Laso poses for a portrait inside his tailor shop in high-end Ajah market, Lagos State.Living in Nigeria after he fled from Côte d’Ivoire in 2010, he now owns a successful men’s clothes shop and employs two Nigerian apprentices, thanks to an entrepreneurship training provided by UNHCR’s partner Justice, Development & Peace Commission.“It’s not because I’m a refugee that I cannot achieve what I want”, he asserts, while recognising his daily struggles with security, the Covid-19 pandemic and his foreigner status. He applied for a microcredit loan to develop his business.
Laso poses for a portrait inside his tailor shop in high-end Ajah market, Lagos State.Living in Nigeria after he fled from Côte d’Ivoire in 2010, he now owns a successful men’s clothes shop and employs two Nigerian apprentices, thanks to an entrepreneurship training provided by UNHCR’s partner Justice, Development & Peace Commission.“It’s not because I’m a refugee that I cannot achieve what I want”, he asserts, while recognising his daily struggles with security, the Covid-19 pandemic and his foreigner status. He applied for a microcredit loan to develop his business.
Laso poses for a portrait inside his tailor shop in high-end Ajah market, Lagos State.Living in Nigeria after he fled from Côte d’Ivoire in 2010, he now owns a successful men’s clothes shop and employs two Nigerian apprentices, thanks to an entrepreneurship training provided by UNHCR’s partner Justice, Development & Peace Commission.“It’s not because I’m a refugee that I cannot achieve what I want”, he asserts, while recognising his daily struggles with security, the Covid-19 pandemic and his foreigner status. He applied for a microcredit loan to develop his business.
Diomade Manman, an urban refugee from Côte d'Ivoire, sits for a monitoring interview in a friend's shop in Ajah Market, Lagos State. Arrived in Nigeria in 2010, she now manages a food stall in a shopping complex with the help of her two older sons, while raising her other 4 children. She benefited from an entrepreneurship training provided by a UNHCR partner, but "the Covid-19 pandemic shuttered my business and pushed me on the streets", she reveals. She could reopen the food stall in January 2021 and hopes for a microcredit loan to develop the activity.
Diomade Manman, an urban refugee from Côte d'Ivoire, sits for a monitoring interview in a friend's shop in Ajah Market, Lagos State. Arrived in Nigeria in 2010, she now manages a food stall in a shopping complex with the help of her two older sons, while raising her other 4 children. She benefited from an entrepreneurship training provided by a UNHCR partner, but "the Covid-19 pandemic shuttered my business and pushed me on the streets", she reveals. She could reopen the food stall in January 2021 and hopes for a microcredit loan to develop the activity.
Diomade Manman, an urban refugee from Côte d'Ivoire, stands in her street food stall near in Ajah market, Lagos state. Arrived in Nigeria in 2010, she now manages the kitchen set in a shopping complex with the help of her two older sons, while raising her other 4 children. She benefited from an entrepreneurship training provided by a UNHCR partner, but "the Covid-19 pandemic shuttered my business and pushed me on the streets", she reveals. She could reopen the food stall in January 2021 and hopes for a microcredit loan to develop the activity.
Diomade Manman, an urban refugee from Côte d'Ivoire, stands in her street food stall near in Ajah market, Lagos state. Arrived in Nigeria in 2010, she now manages the kitchen set in a shopping complex with the help of her two older sons, while raising her other 4 children. She benefited from an entrepreneurship training provided by a UNHCR partner, but "the Covid-19 pandemic shuttered my business and pushed me on the streets", she reveals. She could reopen the food stall in January 2021 and hopes for a microcredit loan to develop the activity.
Diomade Manman, an urban refugee from Côte d'Ivoire, stands in her street food stall near in Ajah market, Lagos state. Arrived in Nigeria in 2010, she now manages the kitchen set in a shopping complex with the help of her two older sons, while raising her other 4 children. She benefited from an entrepreneurship training provided by a UNHCR partner, but "the Covid-19 pandemic shuttered my business and pushed me on the streets", she reveals. She could reopen the food stall in January 2021 and hopes for a microcredit loan to develop the activity.
Diomade Manman, an urban refugee from Côte d'Ivoire, stands in her street food stall near in Ajah market, Lagos state. Arrived in Nigeria in 2010, she now manages the kitchen set in a shopping complex with the help of her two older sons, while raising her other 4 children. She benefited from an entrepreneurship training provided by a UNHCR partner, but "the Covid-19 pandemic shuttered my business and pushed me on the streets", she reveals. She could reopen the food stall in January 2021 and hopes for a microcredit loan to develop the activity.
Diomade Manman, an urban refugee from Côte d'Ivoire, walks the arcades of a shopping complex in Ajah market, Lagos state. Arrived in Nigeria in 2010, she now manages a food stall with the help of her two older sons, while raising her other 4 children. She benefited from an entrepreneurship training provided by a UNHCR partner, but "the Covid-19 pandemic shuttered my business and pushed me on the streets", she reveals. She could reopen the food stall in January 2021 and hopes for a microcredit loan to develop the activity.
Diomade Manman, an urban refugee from Côte d'Ivoire, walks the arcades of a shopping complex in Ajah market, Lagos state. Arrived in Nigeria in 2010, she now manages a food stall with the help of her two older sons, while raising her other 4 children. She benefited from an entrepreneurship training provided by a UNHCR partner, but "the Covid-19 pandemic shuttered my business and pushed me on the streets", she reveals. She could reopen the food stall in January 2021 and hopes for a microcredit loan to develop the activity.
Roland Ade describes and showcases his footwear creations in his cobbler shop. A refugee from Cameroon, he has lived and worked in Ijebu Ode (Ogun state) since 2020. A UNHCR training and the support of his wife, also a refugee, helped create a shoemaking business set along a crowded market road in town. Roland hopes for a microcredit loan to relocate his shop to a place more accessible to his wheelchair.
Roland Ade describes and showcases his footwear creations in his cobbler shop. A refugee from Cameroon, he has lived and worked in Ijebu Ode (Ogun state) since 2020. A UNHCR training and the support of his wife, also a refugee, helped create a shoemaking business set along a crowded market road in town. Roland hopes for a microcredit loan to relocate his shop to a place more accessible to his wheelchair.
Roland Ade describes and showcases his footwear creations in his cobbler shop. A refugee from Cameroon, he has lived and worked in Ijebu Ode (Ogun state) since 2020. A UNHCR training and the support of his wife, also a refugee, helped create a shoemaking business set along a crowded market road in town. Roland hopes for a microcredit loan to relocate his shop to a place more accessible to his wheelchair.
Roland Ade describes and showcases his footwear creations in his cobbler shop. A refugee from Cameroon, he has lived and worked in Ijebu Ode (Ogun state) since 2020. A UNHCR training and the support of his wife, also a refugee, helped create a shoemaking business set along a crowded market road in town. Roland hopes for a microcredit loan to relocate his shop to a place more accessible to his wheelchair.
Roland Ade describes and showcases his footwear creations in his cobbler shop. A refugee from Cameroon, he has lived and worked in Ijebu Ode (Ogun state) since 2020. A UNHCR training and the support of his wife, also a refugee, helped create a shoemaking business set along a crowded market road in town. Roland hopes for a microcredit loan to relocate his shop to a place more accessible to his wheelchair.
Roland Ade describes and showcases his footwear creations in his cobbler shop. A refugee from Cameroon, he has lived and worked in Ijebu Ode (Ogun state) since 2020. A UNHCR training and the support of his wife, also a refugee, helped create a shoemaking business set along a crowded market road in town. Roland hopes for a microcredit loan to relocate his shop to a place more accessible to his wheelchair.
Roland Ade describes and showcases his footwear creations in his cobbler shop. A refugee from Cameroon, he has lived and worked in Ijebu Ode (Ogun state) since 2020. A UNHCR training and the support of his wife, also a refugee, helped create a shoemaking business set along a crowded market road in town. Roland hopes for a microcredit loan to relocate his shop to a place more accessible to his wheelchair.
Roland Ade describes and showcases his footwear creations in his cobbler shop. A refugee from Cameroon, he has lived and worked in Ijebu Ode (Ogun state) since 2020. A UNHCR training and the support of his wife, also a refugee, helped create a shoemaking business set along a crowded market road in town. Roland hopes for a microcredit loan to relocate his shop to a place more accessible to his wheelchair.
Roland Ade describes and showcases his footwear creations in his cobbler shop. A refugee from Cameroon, he has lived and worked in Ijebu Ode (Ogun state) since 2020. A UNHCR training and the support of his wife, also a refugee, helped create a shoemaking business set along a crowded market road in town. Roland hopes for a microcredit loan to relocate his shop to a place more accessible to his wheelchair.
Roland Ade describes and showcases his footwear creations in his cobbler shop. A refugee from Cameroon, he has lived and worked in Ijebu Ode (Ogun state) since 2020. A UNHCR training and the support of his wife, also a refugee, helped create a shoemaking business set along a crowded market road in town. Roland hopes for a microcredit loan to relocate his shop to a place more accessible to his wheelchair.
Bebe Simbu arrived in Nigeria from DR Congo and found support thanks to the Justice Development & Peace Commission, a partner of UNHCR in Ijebu Ode (Ogun State). Now a refugee, she is employed in JDPC office and started making soap as an occupational business during the Covid-19 pandemic. She hopes to sell her products on markets soon.
Bebe Simbu arrived in Nigeria from DR Congo and found support thanks to the Justice Development & Peace Commission, a partner of UNHCR in Ijebu Ode (Ogun State). Now a refugee, she is employed in JDPC office and started making soap as an occupational business during the Covid-19 pandemic. She hopes to sell her products on markets soon.
Bebe Simbu arrived in Nigeria from DR Congo and found support thanks to the Justice Development & Peace Commission, a partner of UNHCR in Ijebu Ode (Ogun State). Now a refugee, she is employed in JDPC office and started making soap as an occupational business during the Covid-19 pandemic. She hopes to sell her products on markets soon.
Bebe Simbu arrived in Nigeria from DR Congo and found support thanks to the Justice Development & Peace Commission, a partner of UNHCR in Ijebu Ode (Ogun State). Now a refugee, she is employed in JDPC office and started making soap as an occupational business during the Covid-19 pandemic. She hopes to sell her products on markets soon.
Bebe Simbu arrived in Nigeria from DR Congo and found support thanks to the Justice Development & Peace Commission, a partner of UNHCR in Ijebu Ode (Ogun State). Now a refugee, she is employed in JDPC office and started making soap as an occupational business during the Covid-19 pandemic. She hopes to sell her products on markets soon.
Bebe Simbu arrived in Nigeria from DR Congo and found support thanks to the Justice Development & Peace Commission, a partner of UNHCR in Ijebu Ode (Ogun State). Now a refugee, she is employed in JDPC office and started making soap as an occupational business during the Covid-19 pandemic. She hopes to sell her products on markets soon.
Mbusthu Djunna Cherabo poses for a portrait in front of her shop set along a busy road in Ikorodu, Lagos State. A refugee from DR Congo, she now manages a convenience store with the help of her late husband's two children. Despite the pandemic interruption and the insecurity in the area, she managed to develop her business and recently applied for a microcredit loan.
Mbusthu Djunna Cherabo poses for a portrait in front of her shop set along a busy road in Ikorodu, Lagos State. A refugee from DR Congo, she now manages a convenience store with the help of her late husband's two children. Despite the pandemic interruption and the insecurity in the area, she managed to develop her business and recently applied for a microcredit loan.
Mbusthu Djunna Cherabo poses for a portrait in front of her shop set along a busy road in Ikorodu, Lagos State. A refugee from DR Congo, she now manages a convenience store with the help of her late husband's two children. Despite the pandemic interruption and the insecurity in the area, she managed to develop her business and recently applied for a microcredit loan.
Mbusthu Djunna Cherabo poses for a portrait in front of her shop set along a busy road in Ikorodu, Lagos State. A refugee from DR Congo, she now manages a convenience store with the help of her late husband's two children. Despite the pandemic interruption and the insecurity in the area, she managed to develop her business and recently applied for a microcredit loan.
Mbusthu Djunna Cherabo stands in front of her shop set along a busy road in Ikorodu, Lagos State. She is a refugee from DR Congo, now managing a convenience store with the help of her late husband's two children. Despite the pandemic interruption and the insecurity in the area, she managed to develop her business and recently applied for a microcredit loan.
Mbusthu Djunna Cherabo stands in front of her shop set along a busy road in Ikorodu, Lagos State. She is a refugee from DR Congo, now managing a convenience store with the help of her late husband's two children. Despite the pandemic interruption and the insecurity in the area, she managed to develop her business and recently applied for a microcredit loan.
Vassodia Bamba assists an urban refugees meeting organised by UNHCR's partner Justice Development & Peace Commision in Ikorodu, Lagos State.Trained in computer science, Vasso fled Côte d'Ivoire's 2010 turmoils and quickly found informal jobs in repair shops around Lagos. After an entrepreneurship training, he could open his own computer fixing company in Ikorodu and now employs 5 persons and trains 10 students, all Nigerian. Covid-19 closed his shop for a year, but a recent loan request could help him buy computers in bulk and get back to profit.
Vassodia Bamba assists an urban refugees meeting organised by UNHCR's partner Justice Development & Peace Commision in Ikorodu, Lagos State.Trained in computer science, Vasso fled Côte d'Ivoire's 2010 turmoils and quickly found informal jobs in repair shops around Lagos. After an entrepreneurship training, he could open his own computer fixing company in Ikorodu and now employs 5 persons and trains 10 students, all Nigerian. Covid-19 closed his shop for a year, but a recent loan request could help him buy computers in bulk and get back to profit.
Vassodia Bamba stands in front of his computer repair shop in Ikorodu market, Lagos State.Trained in computer science, Vasso fled Côte d'Ivoire's 2010 turmoils and quickly found informal jobs in repair shops around Lagos. After an entrepreneurship training, he could open his own computer fixing company in Ikorodu and now employs 5 persons and trains 10 students, all Nigerian. Covid-19 closed his shop for a year, but a recent loan request could help him buy computers in bulk and get back to profit.
Vassodia Bamba stands in front of his computer repair shop in Ikorodu market, Lagos State.Trained in computer science, Vasso fled Côte d'Ivoire's 2010 turmoils and quickly found informal jobs in repair shops around Lagos. After an entrepreneurship training, he could open his own computer fixing company in Ikorodu and now employs 5 persons and trains 10 students, all Nigerian. Covid-19 closed his shop for a year, but a recent loan request could help him buy computers in bulk and get back to profit.
Vassodia Bamba stands in front of his computer repair shop in Ikorodu market, Lagos State.Trained in computer science, Vasso fled Côte d'Ivoire's 2010 turmoils and quickly found informal jobs in repair shops around Lagos. After an entrepreneurship training, he could open his own computer fixing company in Ikorodu and now employs 5 persons and trains 10 students, all Nigerian. Covid-19 closed his shop for a year, but a recent loan request could help him buy computers in bulk and get back to profit.
Vassodia Bamba stands in front of his computer repair shop in Ikorodu market, Lagos State.Trained in computer science, Vasso fled Côte d'Ivoire's 2010 turmoils and quickly found informal jobs in repair shops around Lagos. After an entrepreneurship training, he could open his own computer fixing company in Ikorodu and now employs 5 persons and trains 10 students, all Nigerian. Covid-19 closed his shop for a year, but a recent loan request could help him buy computers in bulk and get back to profit.

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